We Wish You A Safe Christmas

A combination of requests from stitchers for some of Rudolph’s friends to join him, and my husband getting tired of stitching the same ornament over and over again, have inspired me to add two more masked friends.

They are the same size and fabric as what we lovingly refer to as Rona Rudolph. Check fronyritterdesigns.com to see the variations in stitching and finishing for ideas for your ornament. Please stay safe and happy stitching!

This Year’s Stitched Ornament

Every year for the last thirty or so years we have hosted a Christmas breakfast for our closest friends. Every year I paint, bead or cross-stitched an ornament for each family, which means about 30 ornaments. I often begin right after Christmas so I finish in time.

This year I designed this Rudolph whose mask barely disguises his shiny nose. I figured it will help us remember (as if we could forget) this strange year.


I used 32 count Crystal Doubloon Lugano from Picture this Plus, edged it with pom poms from Lady Dot Creates and added a button from Jesse James. Since my husband is stitching some of the pieces, we are using a variety of fabrics and perforated paper, which you can see on the Frony Ritter Designs website.


Snowballs for Sale Cross Stitch

This pattern, in the August 2020 issue of Just Cross Stitch, was born on a paper napkin while waiting for a pizza in Portland. Oregon is always a winter wonderland, even in the summer when we ran into a (fake) snow covered hill where they were filming a car commercial.

‘This pattern uses Galaxy Aida from Mystic Fabrics, beads from Mill Hill and trim from Lady Dot Creates. I found the bucket at Tuesday Morning.

Champagne Cork Snowmen

I like champagne as much as the next guy, but while others are reaching for the bubbly I’m reaching for the corks. I painted these with white acrylic. Then I painted their faces, used the back of my brush for their buttons, and painted pointy toothpicks orange for their long noses. I made my noses extra long because they made me laugh this way. I used a stylus to poke a hole where the nose and screw eye would be and affixed them with tacky glue. I tied 3/8” ribbon in a knot and used fibers to hang. Not pictured: the little red heart I painted on each of their butts.

Snow Day!

This design was born while I was waiting at the doctor’s office and thinking of everything fun instead of the inevitable blood-letting that is part of my yearly physical. This is what came to my mind. I was really using my imagination since the last time my town had a snow day was 1999.

This pattern is in the December 2019 issue of Just Cross Stitch. The framed piece is stitched on 14 count Babbling Brook Jobelan Aida from Wichelt. The frame is also from Wichelt. The ornament version is stitched on 32 count Sea Spray Linen from Wichelt.

Celtic Christmas Ornament

Here is what I designed for the 2017 Special Holiday Issue of Just Cross Stitch. I stitched them on 28 count linen in two different colors, and two threads over two squares, and one thread over one square for the tiny one. Mill Hill beads are on the borders and Kreinik glittery thread is on the wings. The green piece is the one that is featured in the magazine.

Baby’s First Christmas Ornament

This design can be found in the 2016 Christmas Ornament Issue of Just Cross Stitch. I added Mill Hill beads to the piece to sparkle it up. I also added an easy recipe for peppermint chocolate cupcakes with buttercream frosting, marshmallow filling and an infusion of Peppermint Bark Liqueur from Eastside Distilling in Portland, guaranteed to provide you with lots of pleasure and unwanted pounds.

Twenty Minis Fall and Winter

Here is Frony Ritter Designs’ contribution to the Tiny House movement. We have released the Fall and Winter Twenty Minis design chart booklet. I use my leftover fabric and perforated paper to make ornaments, wine charms, jewelry, cards and framed pieces. I even repurposed a mint tin to fill with candies so I can give it to someone who likes to have fun (which means to eat candy).

The many benefits of stitching small things are 1. Getting to use scraps, 2. You can finish a piece quickly, 3. They will fit in a tiny house, apartment, dorm room.