Celtic Christmas Ornament

Here is what I designed for the 2017 Special Holiday Issue of Just Cross Stitch. I stitched them on 28 count linen in two different colors, and two threads over two squares, and one thread over one square for the tiny one. Mill Hill beads are on the borders and Kreinik glittery thread is on the wings. The green piece is the one that is featured in the magazine.

Baby’s First Christmas Ornament

This design can be found in the 2016 Christmas Ornament Issue of Just Cross Stitch. I added Mill Hill beads to the piece to sparkle it up. I also added an easy recipe for peppermint chocolate cupcakes with buttercream frosting, marshmallow filling and an infusion of Peppermint Bark Liqueur from Eastside Distilling in Portland, guaranteed to provide you with lots of pleasure and unwanted pounds.

Twenty Minis Fall and Winter

Here is Frony Ritter Designs’ contribution to the Tiny House movement. We have released the Fall and Winter Twenty Minis design chart booklet. I use my leftover fabric and perforated paper to make ornaments, wine charms, jewelry, cards and framed pieces. I even repurposed a mint tin to fill with candies so I can give it to someone who likes to have fun (which means to eat candy).

The many benefits of stitching small things are 1. Getting to use scraps, 2. You can finish a piece quickly, 3. They will fit in a tiny house, apartment, dorm room.

Stitching on a Tiny Sled

Here is this year’s contribution to the Just Cross Stitch Holiday Issue. The sled is made by Foxwood Crossing and I used perforated paper and did a combination of cross stitch and beading.

I love the memories that sleds evoke. Of course, I never had the traditional light pine sled with red metal. My father, who had more ingenuity than money (and maybe common sense), used scraps to make a big sled for three kids. He used a Formica table top and affixed old skis to the bottom, and didn’t see the need for fancy extras, like a steering apparatus. We would all pile on and the weight of the behemoth set it off at warp speed toward the half frozen pond at the bottom of the hill. Since animals sense danger before people do, even the dog, who began the ride as part of the pile, could see trouble ahead and jumped off before anyone else. We would play chicken to see the last hold out before we would yell “bombs away” and jump ship. Maybe next year I will make a pattern of a huge pieced together sled with a pile of kids and a dog on it, sticking halfway out of a pond.

Snowflakes at midnight

No snowflake is exactly alike. The pile of snowflakes at the bottom of this picture proves it again.  While remembering the magic of snow silently falling in the middle of the night, I experimented with various colors, sparkly threads and beads until it felt just right.  I then stitched it small to make a necklace and then made the pattern using all Delica beads.  This chart is now available through your favorite cross stitch store now.

Cross Stitch for Christmas

I needed some place to put my beloved bunny slippers. So I created a woodland habitat for them. I decided to put my cross stitch designs to work and made them do what they were created to do, which is just hang around. I made a tree for the blue, purple and green ones, and a tree for my red and green ones since the two sets of colors didn’t seem to get along very well together.

Of all the famous sayings about bunny slippers my favorite is this one by Dean Koontz: “Bunny slippers remind me of who I am. You can’t get a swelled head if you wear bunny slippers. You can’t lose your sense of perspective and start acting like a star or a rich lady if you keep on wearing bunny slippers. Besides, bunny slippers give me confidence because they are so jaunty. They make a statement; they say, ‘Nothing the world does to me can ever get me so far down that I can’t be silly and frivolous.’ ”

However, you do not need bunny slippers to have an excuse to decorate a tree with cross stitched ornaments. You can put cats, dogs, fish bowls, teddy bears, ferrets or weasels under your tree–or for the less adventurous, just presents.

New Christmas chart

Here is an ornament you can stitch with a knot within a knot. Also tucked within the knot is the word Noel. You could also personalize it if the name you want to write has four letters and they are not massive, like “w” and “m”. My friend Leon pointed out you don’t even have to change the letters to stitch his name. I already knew that since every year my children change around my NOEL stocking holders which hold four cross stitched stockings. Eventually they ran out of word combinations like LONE, LEON, and not yet invented words like OLEN and ENOL. So they cut out and taped on their own letters that looked so similar I did not realized they made their own words until after many guests had probably seen and politely avoided asking why my stocking holders said “FINK”.

Speaking of inventing new things, due to a bead spilling accident I discovered the very best surface for stringing beads–a piece of plastic canvas. The beads fall perfectly to skewer them and they don’t run away from the needle when they see it coming.

Free Cross Stitch Charts

While wistfully looking at my mitten boxes and waiting to wear these as they are my favorite article of clothing, I decided to make some charts for you, and for Wichelt, who carries my favorite beads and perforated paper. I used leftover pieces of perforated paper, Mill Hill beads and DMC floss.

You can get your free chart to stitch these by going on to www.wichelt.com and while you are at it, check out all the beads they carry.